51 British Castles Full of History ...

Neecey

British castles come in all shapes and sizes - all magnificent. Some look like grandiose houses, others like those of fairytales, ones we dreamed of living in as a fairy princess when we were kids. Some British castles remain the seat of families who have lived in them for generations, even from the times they were built, some have passed into private hands and others are looked after for the nation by the National Trust or English Heritage. If you're visiting the UK on vacation, a trip to at least one of the British castles on this list should be on your itinerary.

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1

Leeds Castle, Kent

Via flickr.com

Rising majestically from its moat, Leeds Castle has stood for 900 years. It is considered one of the most beautiful British castles.

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Leeds Castle is located in Kent, England and is one of the most iconic castles in the country. It was built in 1119 and was originally a Norman stronghold. It has been used as a royal residence, a prison, and a private home over the centuries. The castle is now a tourist attraction and offers visitors a chance to explore the castle's grounds and gardens, as well as its many historical artifacts. The castle also hosts a variety of events throughout the year, including concerts, festivals, and even jousting tournaments.

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Bolsover Castle, Derbyshire

Via Bolsover Castle by Yhun Suarez

Built in the 12th century by the Peverel family, Bolsover Castle is a Grade I listed building owned by English Heritage.

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Bolsover Castle is a remarkable example of a fortified manor house, and is one of the best-preserved medieval castles in England. The castle is noted for its unique and intricate terrace gardens, which were designed in the 17th century and have been carefully restored to their original condition. The castle also features a large collection of ancient artifacts, including armor, weapons, and furniture, as well as a variety of artworks, including paintings and sculptures. The castle is open to the public and offers a range of activities, including guided tours, educational programs, and special events.

3

Cawdor Castle, Inverness-shire

Via Site down

Referred to in Shakespeare's Macbeth although built long after the eponymous villain's time, Cawdor belongs to the Campbells, one of the ancient clans of Scotland. It is known for its beautiful gardens.

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Cawdor Castle is a 14th-century castle located in the village of Cawdor in Nairnshire, Scotland. It is the home of the Campbells of Cawdor, a branch of the Campbell Clan. The castle is said to be the inspiration for Shakespeare's Macbeth, with the character of the same name being based on the historical King Macbeth of Scotland. The castle is open to the public and offers guided tours, as well as a cafe and garden. The castle is surrounded by a beautiful landscape, with a lake and a variety of trees and plants. Visitors can also explore the castle's historic grounds, which include a chapel, a dovecote, and a walled garden.

4

Alnwick Castle, Northumberland

Via Welcome to Flickr - Photo ...

This architecture should be very familiar to you. Alnwick is used for many of the exterior shots in the Harry Potter movies.

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Alnwick Castle is a medieval castle in Northumberland, England, and is one of the largest inhabited castles in the world. It has been the home of the Percy family, the Earls and Dukes of Northumberland, since 1309. Alnwick Castle is also notable for its role in the Harry Potter films, having been used as the exterior of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The castle is open to the public, and visitors can explore its grounds and gardens, and even take part in broomstick training or owl encounters. The castle also hosts a variety of events throughout the year, including jousting tournaments, falconry displays, and medieval banquets.

5

Dunnottar Castle, Scotland

The name means "fort on the slope" and before falling into ruin, Dunnottar played a big role in Scottish history, including being used as the place to hide the "Honours of Scotland" (the Scottish Crown Jewels) from Oliver Cromwell.

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Dunnottar Castle is a spectacular ruin located on a rocky outcrop near Stonehaven, Scotland. It is believed to have been built in the early Middle Ages, and was the site of many battles and sieges throughout its history. The castle was home to the Earls Marischal of Scotland, and served as a refuge for Mary Queen of Scots in 1568. It was also the site of the signing of the National Covenant in 1638.

The castle is best known for its role in the 17th century, when it was used as a stronghold to protect the Honours of Scotland (the Scottish Crown Jewels) from Oliver Cromwell. The castle was besieged for eight months, but its defenders refused to surrender. Eventually, the Honours were smuggled out of the castle in a coffin and hidden in nearby Kinneff Church.

Today, Dunnottar Castle is open to visitors who can explore the ruins and learn about its fascinating history. The castle is a designated Historic Environment Scotland property, and is a popular destination for tourists. Its dramatic cliff-top location and stunning views make it a must-see for anyone visiting Scotland.

6

Bodiam Castle, Kent

Via Bodiam Castle

Kent has a good share of British castles because the county lived for so long under threat of invasion from the French. Bodiam was built in 1385, during The Hundred Years War.

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Bodiam Castle is a stunning example of a medieval castle. It was built in 1385 by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, as a defense against the French during The Hundred Years War. The castle is surrounded by a moat, and the walls are made of Kentish ragstone. Inside, the castle has a great hall, a chapel, a gatehouse, and a drawbridge.

The castle has been used as a setting for many movies and television shows, including Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Doctor Who, and The Princess Bride. It is also a popular tourist destination and is open to the public year round.

The castle is now in the care of the National Trust and is maintained in good condition. Visitors can explore the castle and its grounds, and there are regular events such as falconry displays, jousting tournaments, and medieval reenactments. The castle also offers guided tours and educational activities for children.

7

Arundel Castle, West Sussex

Via Descendants of William deTendring, Knt, ...

Founded in 1067 by Roger de Montgomery, one of the knights of William the Conqueror, Arundel castle has been the seat of the Duke of Norfolk for more than 400 years.

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Arundel Castle is located in West Sussex, England and is a stunning example of a medieval castle. It was built on the banks of the River Arun and is surrounded by beautiful gardens. The castle has been the seat of the Dukes of Norfolk for more than four centuries and is one of the most important historic sites in Britain.

The castle was founded in 1067 by Roger de Montgomery, one of the knights of William the Conqueror. It has been the home of the Howard family, the Dukes of Norfolk, since the 15th century. The castle has been remodeled and extended over the centuries, and now contains a variety of architectural styles.

Today, Arundel Castle is open to the public and visitors can explore the castle's many rooms and gardens. The castle's grounds include a large park, a lake, a chapel, and the ruins of a 12th-century chapel. Visitors can also explore the castle's museum, which houses a collection of art and artifacts from the Middle Ages.

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Stirling Castle, Stirlingshire

Via Blue Pueblo, Medieval, Stirling Castle, ...

Stirling is one of the most important Scottish castles. A number of Kings and Queens of Scotland were crowned here (including Mary, Queen of Scots) and there have been at least eight sieges, including one instigated by Bonnie Prince Charlie.

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Stirling Castle is a stunning example of Scotland’s medieval architecture, perched atop a volcanic rock in the heart of the city of Stirling. It has been a royal residence for centuries and has been the site of some of Scotland’s most important battles and historical events. It is one of the most visited castles in Scotland and attracts visitors from all over the world.

The castle was built in the 12th century and is a great example of the military architecture of the time. It has a well-preserved gatehouse and a beautiful chapel, as well as a number of other buildings, including the Great Hall, the Royal Palace, the Great Chamber, and the King’s Old Building. The castle also contains a number of interesting artifacts, including a royal crown and a number of weapons.

9

Orford Castle, Suffolk

Via English Castles - Orford Castle

Orford is one of the few English castles that demonstrate the Byzantine style of architecture. The keep is well preserved and described as "remarkable" by historians.

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Orford Castle is a historic site located in Suffolk, England. It was built in the 1130s by Henry II, and is one of the few English castles that demonstrate the Byzantine style of architecture. The keep is well preserved and described as "remarkable" by historians. It is a square structure with four circular towers at each corner, and is built with stone and brick. The castle was originally surrounded by a moat, and the earthworks are still visible today.

The castle has been used for many purposes over the centuries, including as a royal residence, a prison, and a military fortification. It was also the site of a siege during the English Civil War, when it was held by the Royalists. After the war, it was used as a coastal defence and a garrison.

Today, the castle is open to the public and is a popular tourist attraction. Visitors can explore the keep, the moat, and the other remaining structures. There are also guided tours available, which provide information about the castle's history and architecture. Orford Castle is a great place to explore and learn about the history of the British Isles.

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Enniskillen Castle, County Fermanagh

Via Enniskillen Castle & Castle Coole, ...

Most castles in Northern Ireland were built by English Lords who were gifted land by the British crown.

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Enniskillen Castle is located in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It is a medieval castle built by the English Lord, Sir William Cole in the 16th century. The castle was originally built as a defensive fortification to protect against Irish rebels and was used as a garrison for English troops. The castle has a long and fascinating history, as it was the site of a siege during the Williamite War in the late 17th century.

The castle is an example of medieval architecture, with its tall towers, thick walls, and defensive moat. It is now a popular tourist attraction and hosts a variety of events throughout the year. Visitors can explore the castle’s history and the various exhibitions and displays that are housed within its walls.

Enniskillen Castle is also home to a museum which showcases the history and culture of the region. The museum contains artifacts from the castle’s past and displays a variety of items from the local area. There is also an audio-visual presentation which provides visitors with an insight into the history of the castle.

11

Conwy Castle, Conwy County

Via 500px.com

Like so many of the great Welsh castles, Conwy was built by English King Edward I during his conquest and repression of Wales. On making it a World Heritage Site, UNESCO declared Conwy to be one of "the finest examples of late 13th century and early 14th century military architecture in Europe."

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UNESCO's recognition celebrates the castle's distinctive features, such as its well-preserved walls and imposing towers which dominate the town's skyline. Constructed between 1283 and 1289, Conwy Castle stands as a testament to medieval military ingenuity. Fascinating for visitors, the fortress is bordered by a scenic estuary, and its battlements offer breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape. The castle also played a pivotal role in several historical events, including the Welsh Revolts. Today, it remains a magnet for history buffs and a proud symbol of Wales's rich heritage.

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Tintagel Castle, Cornwall

Via bloggerpixz.blogspot.it

On rugged cliffs above the sea, Tintagel is claimed to be the castle of King Arthur. Today the castle is in ruins.

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Tintagel Castle is an iconic castle located in the county of Cornwall, England. It is believed to be the birthplace of legendary King Arthur, and is steeped in myth and legend. Built on the rugged cliffs overlooking the sea, Tintagel Castle is a spectacular sight.

The castle was built in the 13th century by Richard, Earl of Cornwall, and is now in ruins. Despite its ruined state, it is still a fascinating site to explore. Visitors can wander through the ruins and imagine what life was like in the castle during its heyday. There are also archaeological excavations that have revealed some of the castle's secrets.

The castle is also home to some interesting wildlife, such as the peregrine falcon and the chough, both of which can be seen soaring around the cliffs. The castle also offers stunning views of the Cornish coast, and the nearby village of Tintagel is well worth a visit.

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Dover Castle, Kent

Via Most Beautiful Ancient Castles | ...

The hugely imposing Dover Castle is the first line of defense when coming from the continent and has stood above the post town since the 12th century.

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Corfe Castle, Dorset

Via Corfe Castle - UK

Now among the most visited ruined British castles, a fortification has stood on this site since the 11th century.

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Corfe Castle boasts a rich tapestry of history. Strategically positioned on a hill, it once served as a royal palace and fortress. Testament to its heritage are the tales of treachery including the imprisonment of King Edward the Martyr and its ultimate destruction by Parliamentarians during the English Civil War. Today, its iconic ruins offer breathtaking views over the Purbeck landscape, capturing the imagination of visitors with every stone and stairwell whispering secrets of its past regal grandeur and dramatic demise. Explore this relic of feudal power and envision the medieval life that once thrived within its walls.

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Caerphilly Castle, Glamorgan

Via The best castles in Wales

Built in the 13th century, Gilbert de Clare designed Caerphilly Castle with very elaborate water defenses. It is the second largest castle in Britain, behind Windsor.

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Situated amidst idyllic Welsh landscapes, Caerphilly Castle stands as a testament to medieval military ingenuity. With its expansive artificial lakes serving as moats, the stronghold was virtually impregnable to the siege tactics of the day. Today, visitors can explore the grand gatehouses and towering inner ward ruins, which offer a tangible connection to the past. The castle is not only a reminder of the power of the Marcher lords but also a popular backdrop for films and television, capturing the imagination of audiences worldwide with its majestic presence and historical grandeur.

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St. Michaels Mount Castle, Cornwall

Via St Michael's Mount

The mount is a tidal island and was once called Mont St. Michel. It was gifted to namesake Mont St. Michel in France by Edward the Confessor, remaining a monastery for many centuries, although passing out of French rule in 1424.

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The fascinating history of St. Michaels Mount is visibly etched in the ancient stone walls and winding staircases that lead through the castle. At low tide, a causeway emerges, connecting the mainland to the island, allowing visitors to walk in the steps of pilgrims who've tread this path for centuries. Once surrounded by the waters of Mount's Bay, the castle boasts sublime panoramic views, creating a majestic marriage of nature and human craftsmanship. Today, the castle is both a family home and a treasure of the National Trust, lovingly preserved for future generations to explore and appreciate.

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Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland

Via Britain's best castles

Although there are many British castles built as part of the nation's coastal defenses, only Bamburgh has such a stunning beachfront location.

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Bamburgh Castle is an iconic medieval castle situated on the Northumberland coast in northern England. It was originally built in the 11th century and has been through many changes over the centuries. The castle is now a popular tourist attraction and is home to the Bamburgh Castle Trust, which works to preserve and protect the castle. The castle has a long history of royal connections, including being home to the Kings of Northumbria and the Venerable Bede. It also has a strong connection to the Percy family, the Earls and Dukes of Northumberland. Visitors to the castle can explore the castle's various towers, walls, and courtyards, as well as the museum and gift shop. The castle also has a beautiful beachfront location, making it a great spot for a day out.

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Beaumaris Castle, Anglesey

Via Beaumaris Castle Anglesey (HDR)

Beautiful Beaumaris is another of the castles built by King Edward I.

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Beaumaris Castle is located in the town of Beaumaris in Anglesey, Wales. It was built by King Edward I in the 13th century as part of his campaign to conquer and subdue Wales. The castle is an example of the concentric castle design, with two rings of walls and a moat. It is considered one of the most impressive castles in the British Isles, and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Despite its impressive design, Beaumaris Castle was never fully completed due to lack of funds. Today, the castle is in ruins, but it is still an impressive sight and a popular tourist destination. Visitors can explore the castle walls, towers, and moat, as well as the surrounding archaeological site.

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Windsor Castle, Berkshire

Via Windsor Castle seen from the ...

Windsor is the Queen's home. Although much time is spent at Buckingham Palace, that is considered the royal office.

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Windsor Castle is the oldest and largest occupied castle in the world, located in Berkshire, England. It has been the family home of British kings and queens for over 900 years and is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. The castle was originally built in the 11th century and has been extensively redeveloped over the centuries. Today, it is open to the public and is a popular tourist attraction, with its State Apartments, St George's Chapel, and the famous Round Tower all open to visitors. Windsor Castle is also the site of the annual Garter Day ceremony, which is attended by the Queen and other members of the royal family.

20

Hever Castle, Kent

Via Welcome to Flickr - Photo ...

Hever was the childhood home of Anne Boleyn, the second wife of King Henry VIII.

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Hever Castle is located in the village of Hever in Kent, England. It was built in the 13th century as a defensive structure, but over the centuries it has been remodeled and transformed into a luxurious country house. It is now a popular tourist destination, offering visitors the chance to explore the castle’s many rooms, gardens, and grounds. Hever Castle was the childhood home of Anne Boleyn, the second wife of King Henry VIII. It is also believed to have been the site of the secret courtship between Anne and the King. The castle is surrounded by a double moat and contains a number of interesting features, including a yew maze, a lake, and a vast collection of historical artifacts. Hever Castle is an important landmark in British history and is well worth a visit.

21

Shane's Castle, County Antrim

Via Irish Game Fair & Country ...

Look familiar? The castle in Northern Ireland is used in HBO's Game of Thrones. It stands near the shore of Lough Neagh, the largest lake in the British Isles.

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Shane's Castle is a historic ruin located in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is situated near the shore of Lough Neagh, the largest lake in the British Isles. The castle is best known for its appearance in the popular HBO series, Game of Thrones. It was built in the late 14th century by the O'Neill dynasty, and served as the seat of the O'Neill family until 1611. The castle has a unique blend of Gothic and Elizabethan architecture, and is a popular tourist attraction. The grounds also feature a picturesque lake, gardens, and a maze. Visitors can explore the ruins of the castle, and take in the breathtaking views from the top of the castle walls.

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Warwick Castle, Warwickshire

Via Welcome to Flickr - Photo ...

Standing on the River Avon, Warwick is stunning medieval architecture and one of the most visited English castles.

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Warwick Castle is located in the county of Warwickshire, England and dates back to the 11th century. It is a popular tourist attraction, drawing in hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. The castle is surrounded by a moat, which is fed by the River Avon, and has a large cliff overlooking the river. Inside the castle walls, visitors can explore the Great Hall, the State Rooms, and the gardens. The castle also has a number of interactive events and activities for visitors to enjoy, such as a trebuchet demonstration, a medieval-style tournament, and a birds of prey show. There is also a museum, a gift shop, and a restaurant.

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Sudeley Castle, Gloucestershire

Via All sizes | SUDELEY CASTLE ...

I visited here on a weekend outing with my parents to watch a Civil War battle re-enactment. I got lost in the boxwood maze!

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Sudeley Castle is a historical castle located in the Cotswolds, Gloucestershire, England, and is one of the few castles still in private ownership. It has a long and storied history, having been inhabited since the time of the Saxons. The castle was the home of King Henry VIII's sixth wife, Katherine Parr, and is the burial place of the last Plantagenet queen, Lady Jane Grey. The castle is surrounded by beautiful gardens, including a boxwood maze, and is the site of many Civil War re-enactments. The castle is also home to the Sudeley Castle Collection, which features artifacts from the castle's long history. Visitors can explore the castle and its grounds, including the ruins of the old chapel, and take part in educational activities such as guided tours and lectures. The castle is open to the public daily and offers a variety of events throughout the year.

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Inveraray Castle, Argyllshire

Via The entrance of Inveraray Castle

Inveraray has been the ancestral home of the Dukes of Argyll, Chief of the Clan Campbell, in Western Scotland since the 17th century. It doubled as Duneagle Castle in Downton Abbey.

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Inveraray Castle is a stunning example of 18th century architecture located in the town of Inveraray, Argyllshire, Scotland. It has been the ancestral home of the Dukes of Argyll, Chief of the Clan Campbell, since the 17th century. The castle was designed by renowned Scottish architect William Adam in 1745 and has been the seat of the Dukes of Argyll ever since.

Inveraray Castle is an impressive building with an impressive history. The castle is made up of three main sections: the Old Castle, the New Castle and the Garden Wing. The Old Castle is the oldest part of the building and dates back to the 15th century. The New Castle was built in the 18th century and is the most impressive part of the castle. The Garden Wing was added in the 19th century.

The castle is home to an impressive collection of paintings, furniture, and other artifacts from the Campbell family. The castle also contains a number of historic rooms, including the Great Hall, the Drawing Room, the Library, and the Dining Room. The castle is also home to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders Museum, which houses artifacts from the regiment.

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Pendennis Castle, Cornwall

Via Pendennis Head, Falmouth, Cornwall, UK

Now in the administration of English Heritage, Pendennis is one of the "Device Forts" of King Henry VIII. It was built to guard the River Fal from potential French or Spanish invasion and sits opposite St. Mawes Castle on the other bank.

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Constructed in the mid-16th century, Pendennis Castle has stood the test of time, witnessing many historical events. Besides its strategic role, the castle was also modified during both World Wars to serve defense purposes. Visitors today can explore its impressive grounds, including the keep, the barracks, and the wartime tunnels. There are also exhibitions that detail the castle’s long history and its role in coastal defenses, providing a blend of education and exploration for those seeking to immerse themselves in Britain's rich past.

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Castle Stalker, Argyllshire

Via Stalker Castle - Scozia

Castle Stalker is a four-storey keep enjoying a picturesque setting on a tidal inlet on Loch Laich, an inlet off Loch Linnhe. It's one of the best-preserved medieval tower-houses surviving in western Scotland

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Castle Stalker is believed to have been built around the year 1320 by Clan MacDougall, who were then Lords of Lorn. It was later held by Clan Campbell of Stalker, after they purchased the castle from the MacDougalls in 1620. The castle is open to the public during the summer months, offering visitors a glimpse into its past. It is also featured in the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. The castle has been designated as a Scheduled Ancient Monument by Historic Scotland, and is now in the care of the Stalker Castle Trust.

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Cardiff Castle, Glamorgan

Via Keep, Cardiff Castle.

Cardiff Castle, dating back to the early days of the Normans, dominates the city center of the Welsh capital.

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Cardiff Castle is a Grade I listed building and one of Wales’ most iconic landmarks. It was built in the 11th century by the Normans as a wooden motte-and-bailey castle, and was later rebuilt in stone in the 12th century. The castle has been remodeled several times over the centuries, and now features a range of architectural styles. It is surrounded by beautiful gardens and parkland, and is open to the public for guided tours. Inside, visitors can explore the castle’s many rooms, including the State Apartments, the Clock Tower, and the Norman Keep. Cardiff Castle is a must-see for anyone interested in exploring Britain’s rich history and culture.

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Belle Isle Castle, County Fermanagh

Via Plan Your Honeymoon | Martha ...

Built in the 17th century, Belle Isle is nowadays a hotel and events venue but is mostly known for its award winning cookery school.

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Belle Isle Castle is located in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It was built in the 17th century and is now a hotel and events venue. It is renowned for its award-winning cookery school, where guests can learn how to make traditional Irish dishes. The castle is surrounded by 400 acres of parkland and woodlands, making it an ideal location for a romantic honeymoon. Visitors can also explore the castle's many historic features, including the ancient yew tree, a Victorian walled garden and a Georgian ice house. Belle Isle Castle is a must-see destination for history lovers and those looking for a unique honeymoon experience.

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Carlisle Castle, Cumbria

Via Carlisle Castle

Carlisle Castle is built on the site of a Roman fort, thought to be the western extremity of Hadrian's Wall. It was once a major stronghold, keeping control of the Scottish border.

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Carlisle Castle is a medieval castle in Cumbria, England, built on the site of a Roman fort. It was originally built in 1092 by William Rufus, the son of William the Conqueror, and was used to control the Scottish border. Over the centuries, the castle has been expanded and rebuilt several times, and today it is a popular tourist attraction. It has been the site of many battles, including the Battle of Carlisle in 1645, and has been used as a prison, a mint, and a royal residence. The castle is now open to the public, and visitors can explore its ramparts, towers, and dungeons.

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Chepstow Castle, Monmouthshire

Sourc

Chepstow lies in the Welsh Marches - once a heavily fortified area along the border of England and Wales. Chepstow is the southernmost Marches castle and was constructed on the instruction of William the Conqueror.

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Chepstow Castle is a historic landmark located in Monmouthshire, Wales. It is the oldest surviving stone castle in Britain, dating back to the 11th century. Built on the orders of William the Conqueror, the castle was designed to protect the border between England and Wales. It has since been used as a military stronghold, a prison, and a royal residence. It has a long and varied history, including being the site of the first recorded use of a cannon in Britain. Today, the castle is open to the public and offers visitors a unique insight into the past. Visitors can explore the castle’s many rooms and towers, as well as its surrounding grounds.

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Warkworth Castle, Northumberland

Via Warkworth Castle

Without full records to establish its history it is undecided whether the castle was built by Prince Henry of Scotland or Henry II of England.

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Warkworth Castle is an iconic castle located in Northumberland, England. It is a Grade I listed building and a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The castle was built in the 12th century and is one of the most well-preserved medieval fortresses in England. It was originally built as a royal fortress and later used as a prison. The castle was also the home of the powerful Percy family, the Earls of Northumberland. It is a popular tourist attraction and has been featured in several movies and television shows. The castle is surrounded by a large moat and is accessible via a drawbridge. The castle also includes a chapel, a great hall, a keep, and several towers.

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Castell Coch, Glamorgan

Via Castell Coch, Autumn III, Wales

One of the most romantic of all British castles. It is built in the Gothic Revival style and is the work of one of the great Victorian art-architects, William Burges. It is worth visiting just for the sumptuous interiors.

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Harlech Castle, Gwynedd

Via The Castles of Snowdonia, North ...

Another of the Welsh castles built on the instruction of Edward I, Harlech is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It's notorious for being the last fortification to surrender to Oliver Cromwell's parliamentary army in the English Civil War.

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Set against the dramatic backdrop of Snowdonia National Park and perched atop a rocky crag with breathtaking vistas of land and sea, Harlech Castle is a prime example of medieval military architecture. Its lofty position speaks to its strategic importance during a tumultuous period in British history, appearing almost invincible against the stark Welsh landscape. Visitors today can immerse themselves in the castle's storied past, exploring its formidable towers and gates that have withstood sieges and the ravages of time. The castle not only offers a glimpse into medieval warfare but also provides a unique vantage point to appreciate the rugged beauty of the Welsh coast and countryside.

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Dolbadarn Castle, Snowdonia

Via Castle and Walls

Once the stronghold of Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great, it stands in the gloriously scenic Llanberis Pass. It was seized by Edward I in 1284 and he used some of its materials to build his new castle at Caernarfon. Today it is a Grade I listed building.

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Dolbadarn Castle is located in Snowdonia, Wales and is a Grade I listed building. It is an important part of Welsh history, as it was once the stronghold of Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great. The castle was seized by Edward I in 1284 and he used some of its materials to build his new castle at Caernarfon. Today, it is a popular tourist destination and a great place to explore the history of Wales. It is situated in the beautiful Llanberis Pass and offers stunning views of the surrounding landscape. Dolbadarn Castle is a must-see for anyone looking to experience the rich history of Britain.

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Castle Menzies, Perthshire

Via Explore Highland Perthshire

The ancestral seat of the Menzies Clan has hosted some illustrious visitors. Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed over for two nights on the way to the Battle of Culloden and Duleep Singh, the last Maharajah of the Sikh Empire, lived here between 1855 and 1858, following his exile from the Punjab in 1854.

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Castle Menzies is a 16th-century castle located in Perthshire, Scotland. It is the ancestral seat of the Menzies Clan, and has hosted many famous visitors over the years. Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed at the castle for two nights on his way to the Battle of Culloden, and Duleep Singh, the last Maharajah of the Sikh Empire, lived there between 1855 and 1858 after being exiled from the Punjab. The castle is now open to the public, and visitors can explore the grand rooms, the extensive gardens, and the historic artifacts which tell the story of the castle's history. Visitors can also take part in a guided tour to learn more about the castle's past.

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Raglan Castle, Monmouthshire

Via List of Post Codes for ...

Raglan Castle fell into disrepair after it had been "slighted" (put beyond military use) in the English Civil War and the owners (the Somerset family) declined to restore it.

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Pickering Castle, North Yorkshire

Via Pickering, Lastingham & Guisborough Priory

Another of the castles administered by English Heritage, Pickering was a traditional motte-and-bailey style castle built by the Normans.

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Originally constructed after the Norman Conquest in 1066, Pickering Castle served as a strategic defensive fortification and a symbol of power. Time has seen to the crumbling of its once formidable walls, but English Heritage has preserved its legacy, allowing visitors a fascinating glimpse into medieval life. Perched atop a hill, the castle overlooks the quaint market town of Pickering, providing a serene backdrop for history enthusiasts and casual explorers alike. Its enduring earthworks and the remnants of stone keep invite imaginations to rekindle the bustle of the past.

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Carreg Cennen Castle, Carmarthenshire

Via Page cannot be found | ...

Sitting on a limestone ridge, Carreg Cennen Castle enjoys stunning views across the Brecon Beacons National Park.

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Caernarfon Castle, Gwynedd

Via Kiss of the Sun

Here we see the hand of Edward I again. A wooden motte-and-bailey occupied the position on the River Seiont and on his instruction it was re-fortified in stone.

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Caernarfon Castle is a UNESCO World Heritage Site located in Gwynedd, Wales. It was built by Edward I in the 13th century as part of a campaign to conquer Wales and was intended to be a symbol of his power. The castle is built with polygonal towers, a barbican, and two gatehouses, and is surrounded by a large stone wall. It also features a royal apartments, a great hall, and a chapel. Caernarfon Castle is a popular tourist destination and is often used for royal occasions, such as the investiture of Prince Charles as the Prince of Wales in 1969. It is also the site of the annual National Eisteddfod of Wales, a celebration of Welsh culture.

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Dunluce Castle, County Antrim

Via IMAGEBACK

Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, built the first castle at Dunluce in the 13th century.

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Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire

Via Belvoir castle

Pronounced "beaver," the ancestral home of the Manners family, the Dukes of Rutland, has stunning views across the Vale of Belvoir.

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Belvoir Castle is a magnificent example of a 19th-century country house that has been home to the Manners family for centuries. The castle is set on a hilltop overlooking the Vale of Belvoir and is surrounded by a beautiful landscape of rolling hills, fields and woodlands. The castle boasts a variety of architectural styles, from the Tudor-style Great Hall to the Gothic-style Chapel. Inside, visitors can explore the grand State Rooms, the Armoury and the Picture Gallery. The castle also houses a collection of fine art, furniture and porcelain. Outside, the grounds feature a terraced garden, a maze, a lake and a deer park. Belvoir Castle is a stunning reminder of Britain's rich history and a must-see for any traveler.

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Eilean Donan Castle, Ross and Cromarty

Via Eilean Donan (1)

The former stronghold of Clan McKenzie and their allies Clan Macrae, the current building is the result of restorations after the original was destroyed in the Jacobite Rebellions. It stands on a small tidal island where three lochs meet, Loch Alsh, Loch Long and Loch Duich in the western Highlands of Scotland

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Eilean Donan Castle is a stunning and iconic castle located in the western Highlands of Scotland. It stands on a small tidal island where three lochs meet, Loch Alsh, Loch Long and Loch Duich. It is a former stronghold of Clan McKenzie and their allies Clan Macrae.

The castle has a fascinating and turbulent history, having been destroyed in the Jacobite Rebellions of the 18th century. It was left in ruins for nearly 200 years until the early 20th century when it was lovingly restored to its former glory.

Today, Eilean Donan Castle is a popular tourist attraction and an iconic symbol of Scotland. It is particularly popular with photographers and filmmakers, having been featured in the movie Highlander and the James Bond film The World Is Not Enough.

Visitors to the castle can explore its stunning architecture and learn about its history through the on-site museum. In the grounds, there is also a gift shop and cafe, making it the perfect place to spend a day out.

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Blair Castle, Perthshire

Via Blair Castle From Gardens Photo ...

Blair dates from 1290 and has been the seat of the Dukes of Atholl for more than 700 years.

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Blair Castle is located in the stunning Perthshire region of Scotland and is one of the most iconic castles in the British Isles. It has been the seat of the Dukes of Atholl for more than 700 years, having been built in 1290.

The castle is a magnificent example of Scottish architecture, with its grand entrance and impressive turrets. Inside, visitors can explore the grand state rooms, drawing rooms, and the impressive collection of artifacts including weapons, furniture, and paintings.

The grounds are also a sight to behold, with the formal gardens, the wildflower meadow, and the ancient yew tree, which is believed to be over 900 years old. The grounds also include the Atholl Country Life Museum which showcases the history of the local area.

The castle is open to visitors all year round, and there are many events and activities taking place throughout the year, from guided tours and outdoor theatre to outdoor concerts and a range of family events.

Blair Castle is a must-see for anyone visiting Scotland, and is a great way to learn more about the history of the region. It is a place of beauty, intrigue, and grandeur, and is a reminder of the rich history of Scotland.

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Kelburn Castle, Ayrshire

Via Kelburn Castle Graffiti Project 1

The amazing graffiti was painted by four Brazilian artists. It was commissioned by the current Lord Glasgow (of the Boyle family who have owned the castle since the 12th century) to help protect the stonework, which needed replacing.

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Kelburn Castle is a stunning castle located in Ayrshire, Scotland. It has been owned by the Boyle family since the 12th century, and is currently owned by the current Lord Glasgow. The castle has recently undergone a unique renovation project commissioned by the Lord Glasgow, which saw four Brazilian artists create a graffiti mural on the stonework. The mural was designed to protect the stonework, which needed replacing. The castle is a popular tourist destination and is known for its beautiful gardens and picturesque views. It is a great example of British history and a must-see for anyone visiting Scotland.

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Dunseverick Castle, County Antrim

Via International Studies Abroad

Now just minor ruins, Dunseverick Castle is one of the most historic castles of Northern Ireland. It was said to have been visited by Saint Patrick and it stands at the end of one of the royal roads from Tara, the ancient home of the Kings of Ireland. The Giant's Causeway cliff path runs past the ruins.

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Dunrobin Castle, Sutherland

Dunrobin is the family seat of the Dukes of Sutherland and like many Scottish castles has been occupied by them for centuries - since the late 12th/early 13th century. The original buildings are obscured by the later additions made in the 19th century.

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Dunrobin Castle is a stunning example of a historic Scottish castle. Located in Sutherland, Scotland, it has been the family seat of the Dukes of Sutherland for centuries, since the late 12th or early 13th century.

The original castle was built in the traditional Scottish style, with its imposing towers and walls. Over the centuries, the castle has been added to and expanded, most notably in the 19th century, when its distinctive French-style turrets were added. The castle is now an impressive sight, with its beautiful architecture and gardens.

Dunrobin Castle is home to a vast array of artifacts and antiques. Its grand halls and rooms are filled with furniture, paintings, and other artifacts from the castle’s long history. The castle also features a collection of weapons and armor, including a 15th century suit of armor.

The castle also houses a museum, which contains a variety of artifacts and displays related to the history of the castle and the Dukes of Sutherland. The museum features a range of items, from ancient coins to weapons and armor, as well as a library of books and manuscripts.

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Rockingham Castle, Northamptonshire

Via Rockingham Castle, History & Photos ...

Another of the English castles that began as a wooden motte-and-bailey just after the Norman conquest of England, Rockingham has commanding views across the Welland Valley.

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Glamis Castle, Angus

Via Glamis Castle, Scotland Greeting Card ...

Pronounced glarms, this is the childhood home of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and Queen Elizabeth's (deceased) sister Margaret was born here. It has been the seat of the Earls of Strathmore, the Lyon family, since the 14th century.

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Glamis Castle is a stunning and historic castle located in Angus, Scotland. It is a popular tourist destination and has been for centuries. It dates back to the 14th century and is the ancestral home of the Earls of Strathmore, the Lyon family.

The castle is most famously known as the childhood home of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and the birthplace of the late Princess Margaret. The castle has a rich history and has been the site of many royal visits and events throughout the years. It is also said to be haunted by the ghost of Lady Janet Douglas, who was burned at the stake for witchcraft in 1537.

The castle is a beautiful example of Scottish architecture and is made up of a number of towers, turrets, and courtyards. It also features a chapel, a great hall, and a number of other interesting rooms. It is surrounded by a large park and gardens, making it a great place to explore.

Glamis Castle is a must-see for anyone visiting Scotland. It is full of history and beauty and is sure to be a memorable experience. Whether you are looking for a romantic getaway or a fun day of exploration, Glamis Castle is the perfect destination.

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Belfast Castle, County Antrim

Via Belfast Castle

The building that stands today was built between 1811–70 in the Scottish baronial style by the 3rd Marquess of Donegall and is quite a distance from the original Norman castle, which burnt down in 1708.

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Fotheringhay Castle, Northamptonshire

Via The Tudors

What you can see in the picture is practically all that remains of a castle that was the birthplace of Richard III and the site of the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots in 1587.

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Fotheringhay Castle holds a ghostly charm, with its secluded mound offering a glimpse into a turbulent past. Dotted with scattered stones and earthworks, the site whispers tales of power struggles and royal drama. Visitors won't find opulent halls or towering battlements here; instead, the beauty lies in the castle's serene riverside setting, where it's easy to envision the historical unfoldings. It's a poignant spot for history enthusiasts to ponder the echoes of bygone eras, where the imaginations are kindled by the intrigue and the fall of dynasties.

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Edinburgh Castle, Lothian

Via Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, Scotland | ...

And to end - one of the greatest Scottish castles. An enduring symbol of Scotland and the host of many significant national events.

British castles are indelibly linked with British history and visiting them is such a fascinating experience. I love visiting them. Have you been to any?

Feedback Junction

Where Thoughts and Opinions Converge

#19 Remembered always as now the resting place of our beloved Queen Elisabeth II, forever loved.

Isn't Mont at Micheal in France not England ?

Where the hell is Pontefract castle in this majestic lineup x

#35 Picture isn't Castle Menzies.

Where is Deal Castle? Or Powys Castle? Or the Tower of London which is actually an occupied castle??

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